China could reportedly use its ‘unwritten’ tech rules as an ‘invisible tool’ against US firms

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.

With Sino-American trade tensions escalating, China’s cybersecurity
standards could be used as an “invisible tool” for retaliating against
Washington’s tariffs, according to one expert.
Such standards are government-issued operational guidelines that are
technically voluntary, but are oftentimes treated as mandatory by
foreign firms’ Chinese business partners.
If Asia’s largest economy were to weaponize the listing of standardized
practices to hit American companies, the cost would be difficult to
quantify, but the move’s effects on foreign firms could outlive current
tensions, according a report from a Washington-based think tank.